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This age old question has been on the mind of every cleaning business owner since the
beginning of time. Throughout the years, there have been non-legal, private individuals
in our industry attempting to take business away from legitimate businesses who work
hard, pay taxes and try to build successful businesses by doing it the right way. They
will always lurking around every corner and threatening to take business from you. This
is nothing new.
In periods of high unemployment we find this even more prevalent as unemployed
people buy a mop and bucket and call themselves “cleaning companies” who will “beat
anyone’s price”!
So how do we combat these nuisances to our business? How do we educate our
customers to the dangers present when choosing “them” over “us”? How do we
compete against that low price? Try this exercise to understand the real value you bring
to your customers:

Step #1. Take several 3 x 5 cards and on each one write down what is good about your
company. In other words write the features you offer your customers.
Example:
We are insured for breakage. We offer trained, uniformed employees. We give
no cost estimates. We will not miss appointments because of a sick child or
personal illness. Those are features.

Step #2. On the back of each card, write how this feature brings a benefit to the
customer or prospect. In other words, of what value is this to the prospect?

Example:
Should anything break during the cleaning of your office or home, we are
insured. Should there be an unfortunate accident of slipping or falling while in
your office or home, we are insured for your protection. We have staff to
complete your cleaning as scheduled and if your regular person is out for some
reason, we have backup available so that cleanings are not missed.
The promotion of the benefits of using your company will often outweigh the low price of
the “non-legal” private individual in most cases. Work on your features and benefits so
that you are ready to overcome the “low price” operators.

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